At this point, these are reblogs - head over to http://kassiber.tumblr.com/ for new original content.

25th June 2014

Photoset reblogged from safx with 54,687 notes

salahmah:

Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.

The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).

Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 

Source: salahmah

25th June 2014

Photoset reblogged from M.GARCIA'S TUMBLR with 221,469 notes

thatsnotwhatiheard:

thesupertzar:

You’re Probably Not Really a Nice Guy (x)

Repost

Always reblog

Source: sassy-hook

23rd May 2014

Chat reblogged from M.GARCIA'S TUMBLR with 49,846 notes

  • Guy: What do girls do at sleepovers?
  • Me: Pass the Bechdel test.

Source: attackofopportunity

5th May 2014

Quote reblogged from been thinking... with 56 notes

Now I feel strong and beautiful. I walk proudly down the streets of Manhattan. The people I love, love me. I make the funniest people in the country laugh, and they are my friends. I am a great friend and an even better sister. I have fought my way through harsh criticism and death threats for speaking my mind. I am alive, like the strong women in this room before me. I am a hot-blooded fighter and I am fearless. But I did morning radio last week, and a DJ asked, “Have you gained weight? You seem chunkier to me. You should strike while the iron is hot, Amy.” And it’s all gone. In an instant, it’s all stripped away. I wrote an article for Men’s Health and was so proud, until I saw instead of using my photo, they used one of a 16-year-old model wearing a clown nose, to show that she’s hilarious. But those are my words. What about who I am, and what I have to say? I can be reduced to that lost college freshman so quickly sometimes, I want to quit. Not performing, but being a woman altogether. I want to throw my hands in the air, after reading a mean Twitter comment, and say, “All right! You got it. You figured me out. I’m not pretty. I’m not thin. I do not deserve to use my voice. I’ll start wearing a burqa and start waiting tables at a pancake house. All my self-worth is based on what you can see.” But then I think, Fuck that. I am not laying in that freshman year bed anymore ever again. I am a woman with thoughts and questions and shit to say. I say if I’m beautiful. I say if I’m strong. You will not determine my story — I will.

Read Amy Schumer’s Ms. Gala Speech — Vulture (via ambercoloredlife)

I don’t know why I’ve been so surprised to see two of the greatest, funniest feminist shows on tv right now (Broad City and Inside Amy Schumer) coming out of Comedy Central, but I sure am grateful they exist. Even (or especially?) in her crassest skits, Amy Schumer is an oracle.

(via beenthinking)

Source: vulture.com

26th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Rhymes With Foam. with 38,502 notes

cuteosphere:

unicorns are notorious for their hatred of posturing bro culture
(I’m debating making this girl available as a sticker and a shirt.)

cuteosphere:

unicorns are notorious for their hatred of posturing bro culture

(I’m debating making this girl available as a sticker and a shirt.)

Source: cuteosphere

23rd March 2014

Quote reblogged from she alone... with 60,402 notes

My father had taught me to be nice first, because you can always be mean later, but once you’ve been mean to someone, they won’t believe the nice anymore. So be nice, be nice, until it’s time to stop being nice, then destroy them.
— ― Laurell K. Hamilton (via psych-quotes)

Source: psych-quotes

29th January 2014

Photo reblogged from I Love Charts with 483 notes

ilovecharts:

Migration flows in the United States
via rifkind-moonchild

ilovecharts:

Migration flows in the United States

via rifkind-moonchild

14th January 2014

Link reblogged from The Rumblr with 19,770 notes

the Bechdel test, the Ellen Willis test, ALL THE TESTS: or, a handy guide to feminist critiques of narrative →

jennirl:

(reference for when i am trying to explain these to people and they are looking at me like “huh”):

  • the Bechdel test: does the story have a) more than one women, b) who talk to each other, c) about something other than a man.
  • the Ellen Willis test: if you flip the genders, does the story still make sense?
  • the Sexy Lamp test (courtesy of Kelly Sue DeConnick): can you replace your female character with a sexy lamp and still have the story work? if yes, YOU ARE A HACK.
  • the Mako Mori test: there is a) at least one female character, b) who gets her own narrative arc, c) that is not about supporting a man’s story.
  • the Tauriel test (which i made up in response to The Hobbit 2 [which passes] and Skyfall [which fails]): a) there is a woman, b) WHO IS GOOD AT HER JOB.

and in justification of my recent TV obsessions, i would like to note thatScandalThe Vampire DiariesBuffy, and Nikita (ALL HAIL MAGGIE Q) pass all of these tests with flying colors.

UPDATE: i just discovered the Finkbeiner test and it is FANTASTIC.

Tagged: Sexy Lampimportant tests

Source: jennirl

5th January 2014

Photo reblogged from I Love Charts with 13,514 notes

rosalarian:

popculturebrain:

Infographic: Movies that passed the Bechdel Test made more money in 2013 | Vocativ

I like this. The Bechdel Test is really worthwhile for analyzing larger trends rather than individual movies. It’s nice seeing stats like these.

rosalarian:

popculturebrain:

Infographic: Movies that passed the Bechdel Test made more money in 2013 | Vocativ

I like this. The Bechdel Test is really worthwhile for analyzing larger trends rather than individual movies. It’s nice seeing stats like these.

Source: vocativ.com

2nd January 2014

Photo reblogged from The Atlantic with 4,425 notes

theatlantic:

How Netflix Reverse Engineered Hollywood

If you use Netflix, you’ve probably wondered about the specific genres that it suggests to you. Some of them just seem so specific that it’s absurd. Emotional Fight-the-System Documentaries? Period Pieces About Royalty Based on Real Life? Foreign Satanic Stories from the 1980s?
If Netflix can show such tiny slices of cinema to any given user, and they have 40 million users, how vast did their set of “personalized genres” need to be to describe the entire Hollywood universe?
This idle wonder turned to rabid fascination when I realized that I could capture each and every microgenre that Netflix’s algorithm has ever created. 
Through a combination of elbow grease and spam-level repetition, we discovered that Netflix possesses not several hundred genres, or even several thousand, but 76,897 unique ways to describe types of movies.
There are so many that just loading, copying, and pasting all of them took the little script I wrote more than 20 hours. 
We’ve now spent several weeks understanding, analyzing, and reverse-engineering how Netflix’s vocabulary and grammar work. We’ve broken down its most popular descriptions, and counted its most popular actors and directors. 
To my (and Netflix’s) knowledge, no one outside the company has ever assembled this data before.
What emerged from the work is this conclusion: Netflix has meticulously analyzed and tagged every movie and TV show imaginable. They possess a stockpile of data about Hollywood entertainment that is absolutely unprecedented. The genres that I scraped and that we caricature above are just the surface manifestation of this deeper database.
Read more. [Image: @darth]


This is a really fantastic essay. Netflix, databases, movies, metadata!

theatlantic:

How Netflix Reverse Engineered Hollywood

If you use Netflix, you’ve probably wondered about the specific genres that it suggests to you. Some of them just seem so specific that it’s absurd. Emotional Fight-the-System Documentaries? Period Pieces About Royalty Based on Real Life? Foreign Satanic Stories from the 1980s?

If Netflix can show such tiny slices of cinema to any given user, and they have 40 million users, how vast did their set of “personalized genres” need to be to describe the entire Hollywood universe?

This idle wonder turned to rabid fascination when I realized that I could capture each and every microgenre that Netflix’s algorithm has ever created. 

Through a combination of elbow grease and spam-level repetition, we discovered that Netflix possesses not several hundred genres, or even several thousand, but 76,897 unique ways to describe types of movies.

There are so many that just loading, copying, and pasting all of them took the little script I wrote more than 20 hours. 

We’ve now spent several weeks understanding, analyzing, and reverse-engineering how Netflix’s vocabulary and grammar work. We’ve broken down its most popular descriptions, and counted its most popular actors and directors. 

To my (and Netflix’s) knowledge, no one outside the company has ever assembled this data before.

What emerged from the work is this conclusion: Netflix has meticulously analyzed and tagged every movie and TV show imaginable. They possess a stockpile of data about Hollywood entertainment that is absolutely unprecedented. The genres that I scraped and that we caricature above are just the surface manifestation of this deeper database.

Read more. [Image: @darth]

This is a really fantastic essay. Netflix, databases, movies, metadata!

Tagged: netflixdatabasesmoviesmetadata